Tag Archives: Old Man Logan

Today’s Super Comic — Old Man Logan #8 (2016)

The first few issues were not a fluke—Old Man Logan is proving to be the most interesting Wolverine series in quite some time. That likely has something to do with its high-concept approach. This isn’t just the superfluous solo stories of Wolverine and his ever-fattening backstory; it’s about a time-displaced Logan trying to avoid his hellish future.

In issue #8, Young Teenage Jean Grey takes Old Man Logan on a tour of places where disaster had struck (will strike?) in the future, showing him how the present is perfectly fine. The increased age disparity creates a fresh dynamic between them. There’s (thankfully) no unrequited love or any sexual tension whatsoever, just lots of mutual respect and affection.

It’s a surprisingly uplifting issue, even with the flashbacks/forwards to the terrible future this Logan comes from. And that seems to be the issue’s message—bad times may very well be on the way, but maybe they’ll be more bearable with the right company.

Writer: Jeff Lemire

Artist: Andrea Sorrentino

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: back issues; Marvel Unlimited; Comixology

Appropriate For: ages 15 and up

Today’s Super Comic — Old Man Logan #3 (2016)

And in the category of “totally unnecessary, but damn, it really kind of works” …

The future Wolverine from the acclaimed “Old Man Logan” storyline inexplicably time-travels to the present, and he sees this as his chance to save the world from the horrible future he’s live through.

One of the problems (not a problem?) with popular entertainment is that successful characters and stories don’t get the luxury of stopping while they’re ahead. They’ll be milked for all they’re worth, especially when a related movie is coming out within the next year. The original “Old Man Logan” was perfectly satisfying on its own merits; no need for anything further.

However, if they must…

Three issues in, and I’m enjoying the series. Logan has a strong motive—he wants to redeem himself as well as save the world. How he arrived in the present remains a mystery. And the book is making superb use of guest stars.

In issue #3, Logan meets the other Hawkeye, Kate Bishop, whose youthful energy provides an entertaining foil for the old man who’s lost everything. Their conversation as they’re running across rooftops is particularly fun…and maybe foreshadows plot developments, too.

I’d rather have the proper Wolverine, of course, but I’m on board with this. Fortunately, several more issues are already on Marvel Unlimited.

Writer: Jeff Lemire

Artist: Andrea Sorrentino

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: back issues; Marvel Unlimited; Comixology; included in Old Man Logan vol. 1: Berzerker (TPB)

Appropriate For: ages 15 and up

Today’s Super Comic — Wolverine #72 (2009)

Well, that took a turn. (Spoilers ahead.)

Wolverine #72 is the second-to-last part of “Old Man Logan,” with the final part printed in Wolverine: Old Man Logan Giant-Sized Special #1. But I think the story should have ended in #72. (The final part is mostly an ultra-violent bloodbath, and frankly a disgusting one at parts, though it does have an excellent final scene.)

The storyline centered on Logan on a cross-country odyssey with Hawkeye, with the former refusing to unsheathe his claws the entire time despite the many dangerous situations they encounter. Having been tricked into murdering the X-Men fifty years earlier, Logan has vowed never to harm another soul. But his young family needs money to avoid the wrath of the Hulks, so he agrees to help the mostly blind Hawkeye drive across what used to be America.

Things don’t go well, but he never once pops his claws. Even as he battles President Red Skull to the death, he uses the weapons of other, long-dead superheroes to do it. He’s still no longer Wolverine as far as he’s concerned—he just wants to get home to his family.

He indeed gets home with the money he had worked so hard for. But too late. The Hulks got bored and killed his family. And out come the claws.

That would’ve been a perfect ending. You know exactly what happens next: old-fashioned berserker Wolverine on a revenge mission, killing those who killed his family. It’s a foregone conclusion, so story-wise, there’s no need to show it. Those final few pages of #72 say everything about the character—no matter how much pain Logan endures, he always “heals.” Wolverine suffers, but he survives and fights for those he loves.

But even with the final part, it’s still an excellent Wolverine story (but NOT for children). It’s a big story that gets at the heart of character by showing him at his most defeated and building him back up.

There’s no way the movie can follow the plot exactly, but it can capture the spirit of it. I remain optimistic.

Writer: Mark Millar

Penciler: Steve McNiven

Inker: Dexter Vines

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: back issues; Marvel Unlimited; Comixology; included in Wolverine: Old Man Logan (TPB)

Appropriate For: ADULTS ONLY

Today’s Super Comic — Wolverine #66 (2008)

I never read “Old Man Logan.” Considering how the storyline is critically acclaimed and the inspiration for the new Wolverine movie that comes out this week, I better get to it.

So far, I’ve just read the first part, in Wolverine #66, and why did I overlook this for so long? Set in a future Marvel Universe in which the good guys lost, Logan is trying to put his superhero days behind him and focus on his family. Yes, the former Wolverine is in a family way, with a wife and two kids. And he’s got no fight left in him, which is a highly unusual—and therefore interesting—state for this character to be in.

I’m surprised this was printed in the regular Wolverine series rather than as a separate miniseries. It certainly feels distinctive enough to stand on its own, especially with the big-name talent behind it (writer Mark Millar and artist Steve McNiven).

This story is building its own world with its own rules, using the Marvel Universe we know merely as a starting point. The inclusion of an old, blind Hawkeye and the grandchildren of the Hulk suggests this story will be playing in a rather large sandbox.

After reading the first part, I want to know what exactly happened and what will happen to make Wolvie get his groove back. I’m assuming that will be the case, anyway … it will be really depressing if it’s not. On to part two, then…

Writer: Mark Millar

Penciler: Steve McNiven

Inker: Dexter Vines

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: back issues; Marvel Unlimited; Comixology; included in Wolverine: Old Man Logan (TPB)

Appropriate For: ages 15 and up