Tag Archives: Nova

Today’s Super Comic — Nova #16 (2014)

I’m still reading Nova for the first time, and the series continues to serve up textbook YA fun with each issue.

Issue #16 wraps up a storyline that showcases how the young new Nova (Sam Alexander) is trying to be responsible, even as he keeps making mistakes. But the important thing is that he goes to great lengths to fix those mistakes.

This particular space-based adventure brings him into contact with Beta Ray Bill, an alien who’s worthy of wielding Thor’s hammer (that goes back to an old Thor storyline I haven’t read). Bill provides guidance and serves as a role model to Sam, and they’re not so busy saving the day that they can’t enjoy the overall experience.

And just as everything seems to be resolved, a new problem arises on the final page, one that no amount of super-powers can fix.

So far, Nova is a brightly colored book with a positive tone. Even though life is never easy for its protagonist, the series remains upbeat. A great option for YA readers.

Writer: Gerry Duggan

Penciler: David Baldeon

Inker: Terry Pallot

Cover: Paco Medina

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: back issues; Marvel Unlimited; Comixology; included in Nova vol. 3: Nova Corpse (TPB)

Appropriate For: ages 11 and up

Today’s Super Comic — Nova #7 (2013)

nova-7-2013So the first issue wasn’t a fluke. Seven issues in, and Nova is tremendous fun.

I appreciate how the creative teams take their time developing this young new Nova into a superhero. Sam Alexander learned a lot in the first storyline, but he’s still got ways to go before he’s ready for the big leagues (i.e., the Avengers, the team his mother prefers he not join at the age of fifteen—very smart mother there).

Issue #7 is framed around Sam searching for an opportunity to save the day in grand heroic fashion. He flies all the way from Arizona to New York City looking for action. He bumps into a Spider-Man who’s not himself (he’s Doctor Octopus in Spidey’s body, which is a whole other long story), but that’s the closest he gets to encountering a super-villain.

He keeps looking to lend a hand somewhere, and he keeps failing to be of any use—in the big situations, anyway. But when he thinks smaller and stops aiming too high, he manages to perform a good deed of genuine value, and he matures just a smidge.

Much more interesting than reading about a superhero who’s perfect from issue #1.

Writer: Zeb Wells

Penciler: Paco Medina

Inker: Juan Vlasco

Cover: Ed McGuinness, Dexter Vines, and Marte Gracia

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: back issues; Marvel Unlimited; Comixology; included in Nova vol. 2: Rookie Season (TPB)

Appropriate For: ages 11 and up

Today’s Super Comic — Nova #1 (2013)

nova-1-2013Marvel is on a roll with the teen books lately. I’ve previously praised the new Ms. Marvel and Spider-Man a few times each…but now it looks like, as Yoda once said, there is another.

I’m not overly familiar with Nova. I could pick him out of a lineup. I could tell you he has something to do with an outer space–based police corps of the same name, not entirely unlike the Green Lantern Corps. I’ve seen this young new Nova in All-New, All-Different Avengers. And that was the extent of my knowledge as I began Nova #1.

We begin on Earth. The previous Nova—now working as a high school janitor—tells his son Sam stories about his glory days saving the galaxy as a member of the Nova Corps. Naturally, Sam thinks he’s making it all up—his unreliable father is no hero in his eyes. And Sam is feeling stuck in his small hometown, hoping to escape someday.

It’s a great entryway into the fantastical outer space adventures to come, making it all seem too good to be true.

The book includes many essential ingredients of a successful teen superhero book. We’ve got the bleeding of fantasy into reality, a flawed but good-hearted parent who isn’t making the teen’s situation any easier, and a powerful desire to escape life’s limits and do something amazing. We also get a cameo by some of the Guardians of the Galaxy, which certainly doesn’t hurt.

Very strong start here.

Writer: Jeph Loeb

Penciler: Ed McGuinness

Inker: Dexter Vines

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: back issues; Marvel Unlimited; Comixology; included in Nova vol. 1: Origin (TPB)

Appropriate For: ages 11 and up