Tag Archives: New Avengers

Today’s Super Comic — Runaways #12 (2006)

In which Wolverine gets punched out by an 11-year-old girl. And that pretty much sums up how fun this Runaways storyline is.

Issue #12 concludes a four-parter that brought the West Coast teens to New York City. Cloak & Dagger, Marvel’s original teenage runaways, need help. Cloak has been framed for attacking and hospitalizing Dagger, and the Avengers (I mean New Avengers) are after him for questioning. The Runaways (though they don’t actually call themselves that) pursue the actual assailant in a new-to-them setting.

Here, the Marvel Universe serves as a playground for the reader, but the book never neglects its main characters. Writer Brian K. Vaughan continues to deepen and flesh out each character while teasing future plots, building something new within an existing framework. He already did the hardest part by successfully introducing an entirely new cast of characters into the MU and getting readers interested. By this point, creative momentum is working in the book’s favor.

And it’s a joy to read.

Writer: Brian K. Vaughan

Penciler: Adrian Alphona

Inker: Craig Yeung

Cover: James Jean

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: back issues; Marvel Unlimited; Comixology; included in Runaways vol. 5: Escape to New York (TPB)

Appropriate For: ages 12 and up

Today’s Super Comic — The New Avengers #11 (2016)

new-avengers-11-2015Well, this certainly has some twists to it.

This is still recent, so I won’t give anything away. But I’m not sure where it’s going exactly, and it’s a delightful change of pace.

Writer Al Ewing makes great use of Sunspot (Roberto Da Costa), a character we’ve been half-expecting to grow up into a super-villain since he was a teenager in the original New Mutants. Now he’s the Supreme Leader of A.I.M.—formerly the villainous Advanced Ideas Mechanics, now the ostensibly heroic Avengers Ideas Mechanics. Ambiguity suits him.

Roberto’s got some big plan in store for the world, and it’s been fun watching the pieces slowly unfold. The endgame is probably benevolent, possibly not.

I’m genuinely curious to see where this is going. And issue #11’s final page only has me more curious.

The book’s got a good sense of humor, too. It sometimes leans a little immature, but that also suits Sunspot…and it’s better than a comic taking itself too seriously, in any case.

Writer: Al Ewing

Artist: Gerardo Sandoval

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: recent back issues; Marvel Unlimited; Comixology

Appropriate For: ages 12 and up

Today’s Super Comic — The New Avengers #1 (2015)

new-avengers-1-2015I’m skeptical about the need for multiple Avengers titles. In recent years, we’ve had All-New All-Different Avengers, New Avengers, Uncanny Avengers, Young Avengers, Avengers A.I., Occupy Avengers, and of course, just plain old Avengers. To be fair, we’re not at ‘90s X-Men levels yet, but one solid Avengers team should suffice.

Then again, a spinoff can always justify itself with an interesting premise that distinguishes it from the parent title, and that’s what we get in the latest iteration of New Avengers.

I missed whatever story led into this, but apparently Robert DaCosta, formerly the founding New Mutant called Sunspot, is now a billionaire and running the formerly (?) villainous organization A.I.M. But instead of being Advanced Idea Mechanics, it’s now Avengers Idea Mechanics and has its own team of Avengers.

The roster features several characters I’m not overly familiar with, which is why I almost overlooked this series. We’ve got Songbird, formerly of the Thunderbolts; Wiccan and Hulking, formerly of the Young Avengers; White Tiger, formerly more of a street-level vigilante type; Squirrel Girl, formerly of the very obscure Great Lakes Avengers; and a Power Man I’ve never seen before who definitely isn’t Luke Cage. And then there’s somebody I actually am very familiar with, Hawkeye, who is primarily serving as a not-secret spy for SHIELD (an open and honest spy is a nice inversion of the team-traitor trope).

The focus here seems to be on big science-y scenarios—comic book science, of course, which tends to be more science-fantasy than science-fiction, but either can be lots of fun. The main villain, appropriately, is an evil version of Reed Richards from the now-defunct Ultimate Universe.

The first issue lays out the basics, but I get the feeling there’s more going on, which will be revealed in time. Always a good impression to leave with the reader—that’s an excellent way to bring me back for more.

Writer: Al Ewing

Artist: Gerardo Sandoval

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: back issues; Marvel Unlimited; Comixology; included in New Avengers vol. 1: Everything is New (TPB)

Appropriate For: ages 12 and up

Today’s Super Comic — New Avengers Annual #1 (2006)

new_avengers_annual_vol_1_1Sweet Christmas, that Luke Cage Netflix series was excellent. So was the Jessica Jones series.

And oh, look, here are they both are in comic book form…getting married. That’s nice for them.

New Avengers Annual #1 is a good example of how to do a wedding issue right—basically, have the wedding itself take up very little of the overall comic. A full-length wedding issue is almost a no-win situation in superhero comics. Super-villains could crash the festivities, and they have, but that’s far too predictable these days. The ceremony could proceed smoothly, which has also been done, and while it’s nice to see likeable characters interact in a happy setting, it tends to be a tension-free affair.

So despite the wedding-themed cover, this annual largely focuses on an unrelated battle between the Avengers and an especially powerful foe, as they employ both brains and brawn to take her down. The battle ties into ongoing arcs and it’s a fun romp on its own.

As for Luke/Jessica, their relationship had evolved since Jessica’s introduction a few years earlier, and the wedding ceremony is merely the epilogue to an arc that had already reached a satisfactory conclusion. They have a nice ceremony surrounded by friends, and Jessica has her moment to be Jessica (written perfectly in character, of course, with the character’s creator writing the issue). And you have an entertaining, notable annual that shows how comic book characters’ lives aren’t static like they were in the olden days.

And nice Stan Lee cameo, by the way.

Writer: Brian Michael Bendis

Penciler: Olivier Coipel

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: back issues; Marvel Unlimited; Comixology

Appropriate For: ages 12 and up