Tag Archives: Jason Aaron

Today’s Super Comics — Wolverine #62-65 (2008)

Wolverine pursues Mystique for four issues. It makes for quite the cat-and-mouse game, and it works because of the long history between the characters—a history that gets embellished via flashbacks here.

Before Wolverine #62, Mystique had recently betrayed the X-Men yet again, and she’s on the run. Cyclops tasks Wolverine with bringing her in, preferably dead (Cyclops had gotten into a dark period—and never really found his way out, come to think of it). Wolverine tracks her across countries while flashbacks show us how he first met Mystique back in 1921 and how they became allies (and a bit more) for a while.

Writer Jason Aaron does a great job adding some depth to Wolverine’s motivation, and he sets up Mystique as an opposite number to Logan. Both are old loners, but whereas Wolverine eventually settled down with his family of X-Men, Mystique has repeatedly rejected that same family.

Another nice touch: Aaron really drills into Wolverine’s head regarding his healing power and how he experiences it. He gives us a clear picture of someone who looks invincible on the outside but is actually in constant physical pain.

These four issues are as violent as you would expect of a Wolverine comic, but there’s a solid story and solid characters beneath it all.

Writer: Jason Aaron

Artist: Ron Garney

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: back issues; Marvel Unlimited; Comixology; Wolverine: Get Mystique (TPB)

Appropriate For: ages 15 and up

Today’s Super Comics — Star Wars #1-6 (2015)

Star_Wars_Marvel_2015_1Of course it’s not the movies, but the first six issues of Marvel’s current Star Wars series are the next best thing.

Set between the original movie and The Empire Strikes Back, the comic presents classic characters in their prime. Everyone “sounds” exactly as they should, and Jason Aaron’s scripts also manage to make the events feel exciting and consequential without contradicting the established continuity—not an easy task when the main story has already been told.

Artist John Cassaday excels at drawing relatively realistic figures, as well as cinematic panels, making him the perfect choice to draw this initial storyline. The characters look like their respective actors (or costumes) as much as we can reasonably expect.

It’s essential reading for any diehard Star Wars fan, and it will help tide you over until the next movie.

Writer: Jason Aaron

Artist: John Cassaday

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: back issues; Marvel Unlimited; Comixology; Star Wars vol. 1: Skywalker Strikes (TPB)

Appropriate For: ages 11 and up

Today’s Super Comic — Doctor Strange #4 (2016)

Doctor Strange 4Something is killing Sorcerer Supremes…and books. Books are also dying from mystical causes—Doctor Strange’s books, at least.

Issue #4 continues the compelling first storyline of the latest series to chronicle the adventures of Stephen Strange. Problems mount in Doctor Strange’s weird world, and this time the threat isn’t just to the regular world…it’s to magic itself.

Another excellent issue by Jason Aaron and Chris Bachalo. Bachalo in particular is perfectly cast as the artist here. I’ve always enjoyed his distinctive, fluid style, and it especially suits the world of magic. He makes great use of each page’s limited space.

I’m ready for the next issue to hit Marvel Unlimited.

Writer: Jason Aaron

Penciler: Chris Bachalo

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: recent back issues; Marvel Unlimited; Comixology; Doctor Strange vol. 1: The Way of the Weird (HC)

Appropriate For: ages 13 and up

Today’s Super Comic — Doctor Strange #3 (2015)

Doctor Strange 3Writer Jason Aaron and artist Chris Bachalo continue to have fun with Doctor Strange. Looks like they’re getting the character in good shape for this year’s movie.

The visuals take the lead in the current series’ third issue, the latest available on Marvel Unlimited (not really “unlimited” then, is it?), as monsters chase Doctor Strange’s astral form across New York. It’s a great way to showcase Strange’s resourceful and knowledge while letting Bachalo cut loose with imaginative pages.01

And it continues to set up a larger plot involving some not-nice people wanting to kill all magic, so that should be fun, too.

This creative team is the first to get me interested in an ongoing Doctor Strange series. Well done.

Writer: Jason Aaron

Penciler: Chris Bachalo

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: recent back issues; Marvel Unlimited; Comixology; included in Doctor Strange: The Way of the Weird (HC)

Appropriate For: ages 13 and up