Tag Archives: Andrea Sorrentino

Today’s Super Comic — Old Man Logan #8 (2016)

The first few issues were not a fluke—Old Man Logan is proving to be the most interesting Wolverine series in quite some time. That likely has something to do with its high-concept approach. This isn’t just the superfluous solo stories of Wolverine and his ever-fattening backstory; it’s about a time-displaced Logan trying to avoid his hellish future.

In issue #8, Young Teenage Jean Grey takes Old Man Logan on a tour of places where disaster had struck (will strike?) in the future, showing him how the present is perfectly fine. The increased age disparity creates a fresh dynamic between them. There’s (thankfully) no unrequited love or any sexual tension whatsoever, just lots of mutual respect and affection.

It’s a surprisingly uplifting issue, even with the flashbacks/forwards to the terrible future this Logan comes from. And that seems to be the issue’s message—bad times may very well be on the way, but maybe they’ll be more bearable with the right company.

Writer: Jeff Lemire

Artist: Andrea Sorrentino

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: back issues; Marvel Unlimited; Comixology

Appropriate For: ages 15 and up

Today’s Super Comic — Old Man Logan #3 (2016)

And in the category of “totally unnecessary, but damn, it really kind of works” …

The future Wolverine from the acclaimed “Old Man Logan” storyline inexplicably time-travels to the present, and he sees this as his chance to save the world from the horrible future he’s live through.

One of the problems (not a problem?) with popular entertainment is that successful characters and stories don’t get the luxury of stopping while they’re ahead. They’ll be milked for all they’re worth, especially when a related movie is coming out within the next year. The original “Old Man Logan” was perfectly satisfying on its own merits; no need for anything further.

However, if they must…

Three issues in, and I’m enjoying the series. Logan has a strong motive—he wants to redeem himself as well as save the world. How he arrived in the present remains a mystery. And the book is making superb use of guest stars.

In issue #3, Logan meets the other Hawkeye, Kate Bishop, whose youthful energy provides an entertaining foil for the old man who’s lost everything. Their conversation as they’re running across rooftops is particularly fun…and maybe foreshadows plot developments, too.

I’d rather have the proper Wolverine, of course, but I’m on board with this. Fortunately, several more issues are already on Marvel Unlimited.

Writer: Jeff Lemire

Artist: Andrea Sorrentino

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: back issues; Marvel Unlimited; Comixology; included in Old Man Logan vol. 1: Berzerker (TPB)

Appropriate For: ages 15 and up

Today’s Super Comic — Green Arrow #17 (2013)

Green Arrow 17Green Arrow’s New 52 series became pretty amazing as of #17, thanks to excellent writing and artwork by Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino, respectively.

The story introduces the idea of Oliver not living up to his potential, and then it blows up his life in a way that evokes the classic Daredevil storyline “Born Again” without copying it. It’s one of my favorite story types, and one Green Arrow is a perfect fit for—the hero having to rebuild himself into something better. It works especially well in comics, as you get the character-development benefits of an origin story without having to rehash the same old tale.

Sorrentino’s gritty artwork grounds the events and suits a non-powered protagonist. Not only does each page fluidly advance the strong script, but they’re all fantastic to look at.

The whole issue screams, “Exciting fresh start!” This sort of thing is exactly what the New 52 should have been all along.

Writer: Jeff Lemire

Artist: Andrea Sorrentino

Publisher: DC Comics

How to Read It: back issues; Comixology; included in Green Arrow vol. 4: The Kill Machine (TPB)

Appropriate For: ages 13 and up