Tag Archives: All-New All-Different Avengers

Today’s Super Comic — All-New, All-Different Avengers #13 (2016)

This was an interesting way to tie into the Civil War II crossover. The larger storyline centers on a debate about using precognitive powers to prevent crime and disasters before they happen. All-New, All-Different Avengers #13 spins that off into a time-travel tangent.

The issue stars only one Avenger, the Vision, and the script reads like it could’ve been part of his solo series, putting us firmly in the artificial man’s logical brain as he works through a moral conundrum.

One of the Avengers’ greatest enemies, Kang, comes from the future. Whenever he strikes, he has the advantage of history on his side, thereby imperiling not only the Avengers, but also the entire world and future generations. So, Vision wonders, why not use time-travel against the time-traveler? Why not locate Kang as a baby and remove a tyrant from history? What’s one innocent life vs. millions?

The dilemma isn’t original by any means, but it’s a reliable one and it suits the Vision’s character. And it’s not resolved in this issue, so I’ll be curious to see how it plays out.

Writer: Mark Waid

Artist: Adam Kubert

Cover: Alex Ross

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: recent back issues; Marvel Unlimited; Comixology

Appropriate For: ages 12 and up

Today’s Super Comic — All-New, All-Different Avengers #12 (2016)

all-new-all-different-avengers-12-coverAll-New, All-Different Avengers might just be the best team book currently on the market. The superheroics are solid, and the roster has great chemistry. Except for Iron Man and Vision, none of these characters is the first-generation version of the brand, but each one feels legit.

Issue #12, written by Mark Waid, showcases inventive action, as the team battles a powerful threat in the Negative Zone—but, due to Marvel physics, only one Avenger can be in the Negative Zone at a time, thereby requiring a tag-team strategy.

Meanwhile, the new Wasp bonds with the original, and I’m pleased to see the book forgo any petty squabbling or contrived tension between the two. While Janet Van Dyne will likely always be the best Wasp, this new version shows tremendous promise. She’s eager, she’s sincerely interested in doing the right thing, and the Avengers’ world is new and exciting to her. She has to potential to serve as a fresh viewpoint into the well-established Marvel Universe. Best of all, she’s not a replacement.

This series was well worth springing for the trade.

Writer: Mark Waid

Artist: Mahmud Asrar

Cover: Alex Ross

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: recent back issues; Comixology; included in All-New, All-Different Avengers vol. 2: Family Business (TPB)

Appropriate For: ages 11 and up

Today’s Super Comic — All-New, All-Different Avengers #6 (2016)

All-New-All-Different-Avengers-6-coverLeave it to the ever-reliable Mark Waid to craft a new Avengers series that feels both classic and fresh. A large part of this book’s success is due to the exceptionally well-balanced roster—three adults, three teenagers, and one android.

All the superhero names are pretty well established, but except for Iron Man and Vision, none are the original incarnations (though the Vision isn’t exactly like his original self, so really just Iron Man). We’ve got the former Falcon as the new Captain America, the new female Thor (I won’t spoil her identity since it was a secret not too long ago), the new teenaged Ms. Marvel, the Miles Morales Spider-Man imported from the Ultimate line, and a teenaged Nova (I haven’t read much Nova, but I’m pretty sure this kid isn’t the original).

This issue wraps up the first story arc, revealing a worthy villain for the new team and providing the sort of large-scale action the Avengers have always thrived in. The specific plot isn’t too noteworthy, but it serves as just the right vehicle to showcase the new team. Most important, the characters never get lost in the shuffle. Everyone has a distinct personality that shines through. The relationships between the members create a wonderful team dynamic. And each Avenger is first and foremost a hero. Plus, at no point does anything ever get oppressively serious.

This Avengers series definitely earns the name, and it’s a specific assemblage I want to continue to see working together. I knew I could trust Waid to get it right.

Writer: Mark Waid

Artist: Mahmud Asrar

Publisher: Marvel Comics

How to Read It: recent back issues; included in All-New, All-Different Avengers vol. 1: The Magnificent Seven (TPB); Comixology

Appropriate For: ages 12 and up